Dr. Boozman's Check-up

There was a lot to talk about on Jonesboro’s KASU this morning. We discussed the Farm Bill that is on the Senate floor right now. We’re offering amendments to make the bill better and provide safety nets for crops across the country. We discussed the scandals including the IRS and the upcoming immigration legislation that is expected to be on the floor in June. You can listen to the interview here.

Abuses at the IRS, the farm bill advances, the water resources bill clears the Senate and much more in this edition of the “Week in Review.”

  • Zero Tolerance:  Everyone needs to be treated fairly under the law. Clearly, there are employees at the IRS who do not subscribe to this principle. There must be zero tolerance for the actions of those individuals.

  • Ag Committee Passes New Farm Bill: This week in the Senate Agriculture Committee, we passed a bipartisan farm bill with my support. Learn more about this important legislation in this episode of “From the Mailbag.”

  • Water Resources Bill Passes Senate: This week, the Senate adopted the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA), a major water resources law that included two of my amendments.
     
  • National Police Week:  This week is National Police Week. I thank the law enforcement officers in Arkansas and across the country who dedicate their lives to protecting our children and communities and seek to bring criminals to justice.
  • Fighting Against Food Insecurity:  I appreciate the efforts of the Congressional Hunger Center which continues to be a leader in fight against hunger this front. I’m grateful to have been honored as the recipient of their “Bill Emerson & Mickey Leland Hunger Leadership Award” this week.

The Senate Agriculture Committee will vote on the farm bill today. Senator Boozman talks about the importance of this legislation to Arkansas' agriculture community in this edition of “From the Mailbag.”

Zero Tolerance

May 14 2013

On his radio show yesterday, Dave Elswick asked me about the reports that the IRS targeted conservative political groups during the 2012 election. In addition to targeting groups to see if they were violating their tax-exempt status, it appears that IRS officials may have lied to Congress in an effort to cover-up the agency’s misdeeds.

On top of it all, we learned last night that it wasn’t just a few rouge agents in Cincinnati who were responsible for this massive overreach, but that IRS officials at the agency’s Washington headquarters also sent queries to conservative groups asking about their donors.

There are a lot of questions that need to be answered by top officials at the agency.

Who carried this campaign against conservative organizations out? Who ordered it? How many groups were targeted beyond what has already been reported?

The Associated Press reported that an inspector general’s investigation reveals that senior IRS officials—including the head of the agency’s division that oversees tax-exempt groups—knew about these unfair actions as far back as 2011. Who else knew? How high up the chain were they? Did they cover it up?

The good news is that people on both sides of the aisle—Republicans and Democrats—are rightfully outraged by this shocking abuse of power. We’re going to get to the bottom of this. People will be held accountable. At the very least, those engaging in these unethical actions need to be fired. If they broke the law, they need to be prosecuted. 

This scandal gives the already-maligned IRS a black eye. It reinforces people’s worst fears about Washington—that those in power will use any means necessary to maintain that power.

Everyone needs to be treated fairly under the law. Clearly, there are employees at the IRS who do not subscribe to this principle. There must be zero tolerance for the actions of those individuals. It’s time to clean house at the agency.  

Benghazi, the backlog at the VA and my first online town hall were at the top of the list of a very busy week in Washington.

  • The Questions Surrounding the Administration’s Benghazi Claims:  The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee heard testimony this week from career diplomats stationed in Libya about what happened before and during the Benghazi terror attack of September 11, 2012. Watch as I lay out my concerns about the accounts in this edition of “From the Mailbag.”
     
  • Unclog the VA: Our veterans and their families have sacrificed to serve our country and we must protect and provide the care they earned. That’s why I recently raised an extremely troubling problem with the administration that is affecting hundreds of thousands of our nation’s veterans—the claims backlog at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

  • Staying in Touch While in Washington: I held my first Crowd Hall online town hall this week and fielded a number of questions on the online sales tax, immigration, tax reform, Obamacare, spending and more. Read all the questions, comments and my responses here.

  • Helping Servicemembers Transition to Civilian Life: We joined Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV), Jerry Moran (R-KS) and Jon Tester (D-MT) to introduce legislation allowing servicemembers to use their GI Bill benefits to provide them with the tools for a successful transition into civilian life by requiring that men and women leaving military life be given the choice of education tracks as part of mandatory Transitional Assistance Program (TAP) classes.

  • Reviewing Illegal Abortion Practices: You may have read about the horrible atrocities surrounding the case of Dr. Kermit Gosnell, the Philadelphia doctor who performed late-term abortions and is on trial for allegedly killing several newborn babies and a patient. My colleagues and I introduced a resolution Monday asking to review public policies that led to these illegal abortion practices and calls on Congress “to investigate and correct abusive, unsanitary, and illegal abortion practices.”

  • The AMMO Act: You’ve read the news reports, heard from your neighbors and friends or and maybe even seen firsthand that there is an ammunition shortage. I cosponsored the “Ammunition Management for More Obtainability (AMMO) Act of 2013.” This prohibits agencies covered by this legislation from purchasing or storing more ammunition than it retained on average between 2001 and 2009. The AMMO Act would require the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to audit federal agencies purchases of ammunition. Read more about it here
  • Visiting with Arkansas Teens: I met this week with Tiffany Easter of Sheridan and Blake Abston of Little Rock, who were recently named Arkansas’s top two youth volunteers of 2013 by the Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Read their uplifting stories here

The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee heard testimony this week from career diplomats stationed in Libya about what happened before and during the Benghazi terror attack of September 11, 2012. Senator Boozman talks about his concerns about the accounts in this edition of “From the Mailbag.”

You may have read about the horrible atrocities surrounding the case of Dr. Kermit Gosnell, the Philadelphia doctor who performed late-term abortions and is on trial for allegedly killing several newborn babies and a patient.

Dr. Gosnell’s alleged actions are unlawful, horrific and unacceptable. That’s why I cosponsored a Senate resolution asking to review public policies that led to these illegal abortion practices and calls on Congress “to investigate and correct abusive, unsanitary, and illegal abortion practices.”

We have an obligation to the public to provide oversight to our medical community whether or not we agree with the practice. If this is happening at one abortion clinic it’s possible that is happening at others across the country. We have no way of knowing how widespread this problem is, but we need to correct the policies that failed these women and babies and prevent these dangerous conditions from continuing. Read more about the resolution from the Daily Caller. 

My colleagues and I introduced this resolution Monday and it was set for unanimous passage by that evening, however one Senator blocked it. This is unfortunate because we have the ability to provide oversight on these practices to prevent these tragedies from continuing. 

We need to work to promote an appreciation for the family and for all human life.  I will continue to fight to protect the lives of the unborn.

AMMO Act

Access to Ammunition

May 07 2013

You’ve read the news reports, heard from your neighbors and friends or and maybe even seen firsthand that there is an ammunition shortage. Ammunition sales are at a record high and not showing signs of letting up any time soon. I recently met with some folks from Remington who told me that ammunition is flying off the shelves faster than the company can get it off the production line. 

Since the shortage began, we’ve heard from a lot of people who have concerns about how the federal government’s purchasing of large quantities of ammunition may be impacting the availability. In particular, there is a concern about reports that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has been purchasing millions of rounds of ammunition, reports that appear to be unfounded. 

DHS is tasked with providing the tools necessary to train federal law enforcement agents. The need to continue the training that is required of these agents while a shortage of ammunition exits forced DHS to increase the amount of ammunition it purchases according to the agency. The agency does not appear to be acquiring more ammunition than it needs for those purposes. 

While I support providing the tools necessary to train federal law enforcement officials, it should not come at a cost to Americans who enjoy exercising their Second Amendment right. Arkansans have a right to ammunition whether for hunting, enjoying the shooting range or for protection. 

To prevent DHS and other federal agencies, except the Department of Defense, from storing excessive amounts of ammunition, I cosponsored the Ammunition Management for More Obtainability (AMMO) Act of 2013. This prohibits agencies covered by this legislation from purchasing or storing more ammunition than it retained on average between 2001 and 2009. The AMMO Act would require the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to audit federal agencies purchases of ammunition.

During a recent dinner at the White House, we had a chance to discuss issues we were concerned about with President Obama. I took the opportunity to raise a little discussed, but extremely troubling problem that the administration is not doing enough to address—the claims backlog at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

According to some reports, the wait time for initial disability claims is almost a full year, and closer to two years in some parts of the country. In the last four years, the number of claims pending for over a year has grown by over 2000 percent, despite a 40 percent increase in the VA’s budget. This is an alarming stat that was referenced in a letter we sent to President Obama earlier this week that outlined our concerns and urged his “direct and public involvement” in this matter.

While the VA has received everything it has asked for in terms of more funding and more employees, it has only resulted in more delays for veterans. Other departments have been asked to do more with less, while the VA’s budget has continued to grow in recent years. Furthermore, the VA is not subjected to sequestration, like the majority of the federal government.

The sad reality is that the VA has been stuck in the past. While they have been transitioning to an electronic records system that should dramatically reduce wait times, the department, for the most part, continues to operate with a paper record system.

Yesterday, the Veterans Benefits Administration—an organizational element of the VA that processes disability, pension and other claims for the larger agency—announced it has eliminated bonuses, saying money slated to go to executives instead will be reinvested to accelerate elimination of the backlog. This is a step in the right direction. If the claims of veterans are not being processed, the people at the top do not deserve a reward.

Serving our country in uniform is an extremely noble undertaking that all-too-often goes under-appreciated and unnoticed. This is a terrible wrong that needs to be righted. We can start by fixing the last place where our veterans should go ignored, which is at the VA.

Follow the link below to read the letter sixty-six of my colleagues and I sent to President Obama on this issue.

Furloughs, health care and a visit from the Jonesboro Chamber of Commerce were among the highlights of this week in Washington.